Photo of Da day @ Da Pine #288

Silverleaf Nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav.)

While this plant is listed in several states as noxious, it has a good looking bloom. It hardily grows under drought conditions and with our recent showers, it is flourishing.

I often get down low with it and it is a favorite of mine to photograph. I found these two blooms growing in an unusual back to back mirror like placement.

We  list it as a noxious plant, poisonous to both cattle and humans while Native Indians found many uses for things we just walk by:

The Zuni used it for treating toothaches and snakebites.

The Navajo treated respiratory symptoms with the plant, including throat and nose problems.

The Pima also used the crushed fruits a treatment for colds.

Mexican folk healers used the plant, calling it buena mujer, to treat fits of sneezing.

The plant contains enough enzymes to be used as a rennet, or digestive agent in milk. The Navajo, the Pima, Cochiti, all used the fruit of the plant for this purpose.

And finally, on a lighter note, the fruits were used as adornment. Keresan women made the fruits into necklaces.

They will not treat you kindly if you use your bare hands to pick a flower as the stems are covered with a bountiful quantity of bristles.

Find beauty and use for the everyday things on your journey†††††††nada te turbe††††jim

via Photo of Da day @ Da Pine #288.

Photo of Da day @ Da Pine #288

Silverleaf Nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav.)

While this plant is listed in several states as noxious, it has a good looking bloom. It hardily grows under drought conditions and with our recent showers, it is flourishing.

I often get down low with it and it is a favorite of mine to photograph. I found these two blooms growing in an unusual back to back mirror like placement.

We  list it as a noxious plant, poisonous to both cattle and humans while Native Indians found many uses for things we just walk by:

The Zuni used it for treating toothaches and snakebites.

The Navajo treated respiratory symptoms with the plant, including throat and nose problems.

The Pima also used the crushed fruits a treatment for colds.

Mexican folk healers used the plant, calling it buena mujer, to treat fits of sneezing.

The plant contains enough enzymes to be used as a rennet, or digestive agent in milk. The Navajo, the Pima, Cochiti, all used the fruit of the plant for this purpose.

And finally, on a lighter note, the fruits were used as adornment. Keresan women made the fruits into necklaces.

They will not treat you kindly if you use your bare hands to pick a flower as the stems are covered with a bountiful quantity of bristles.

Find beauty and use for the everyday things on your journey†††††††nada te turbe††††jim

Puff Of Smoke Poems

~everyday poetry, every day

Laura Macky

Journey of a body on this earth

Invisible Horse

Living in the moment

meticulousmick

Throwing out some shapes

Where God Takes Me

He went out the mountain to pray... Luke 6:12

101 Cooking For Two

Everyday Recipes for Two (with lots of leftovers)

Jenna L. Sexton, PhD

Writer, researcher, perpetual student...

familypromiseofmidland

Ending Homelessness One Family at a Time.

Mikki Senkarik

Original Oil Paintings in Progress

The Collaborative Writer

Demythologizing cultural beliefs about writing, one post at a time

My Stuff Is Not Me

I need, I need, I need! Gimme, Gimme, Gimme!

Barefoot Christian Faith

Welcoming believers and skeptics alike to wander in the wilderness seeking God, asking questions, and walking the barefoot path.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,702 other followers

%d bloggers like this: