Photo of Da day @ Da Pine #288

Silverleaf Nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav.)

While this plant is listed in several states as noxious, it has a good looking bloom. It hardily grows under drought conditions and with our recent showers, it is flourishing.

I often get down low with it and it is a favorite of mine to photograph. I found these two blooms growing in an unusual back to back mirror like placement.

We  list it as a noxious plant, poisonous to both cattle and humans while Native Indians found many uses for things we just walk by:

The Zuni used it for treating toothaches and snakebites.

The Navajo treated respiratory symptoms with the plant, including throat and nose problems.

The Pima also used the crushed fruits a treatment for colds.

Mexican folk healers used the plant, calling it buena mujer, to treat fits of sneezing.

The plant contains enough enzymes to be used as a rennet, or digestive agent in milk. The Navajo, the Pima, Cochiti, all used the fruit of the plant for this purpose.

And finally, on a lighter note, the fruits were used as adornment. Keresan women made the fruits into necklaces.

They will not treat you kindly if you use your bare hands to pick a flower as the stems are covered with a bountiful quantity of bristles.

Find beauty and use for the everyday things on your journey†††††††nada te turbe††††jim

via Photo of Da day @ Da Pine #288.

Photo of Da day @ Da Pine #288

Silverleaf Nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav.)

While this plant is listed in several states as noxious, it has a good looking bloom. It hardily grows under drought conditions and with our recent showers, it is flourishing.

I often get down low with it and it is a favorite of mine to photograph. I found these two blooms growing in an unusual back to back mirror like placement.

We  list it as a noxious plant, poisonous to both cattle and humans while Native Indians found many uses for things we just walk by:

The Zuni used it for treating toothaches and snakebites.

The Navajo treated respiratory symptoms with the plant, including throat and nose problems.

The Pima also used the crushed fruits a treatment for colds.

Mexican folk healers used the plant, calling it buena mujer, to treat fits of sneezing.

The plant contains enough enzymes to be used as a rennet, or digestive agent in milk. The Navajo, the Pima, Cochiti, all used the fruit of the plant for this purpose.

And finally, on a lighter note, the fruits were used as adornment. Keresan women made the fruits into necklaces.

They will not treat you kindly if you use your bare hands to pick a flower as the stems are covered with a bountiful quantity of bristles.

Find beauty and use for the everyday things on your journey†††††††nada te turbe††††jim

The Life Wanderer †

So yah, this is basically a page where you'll be seeing a whole lot of weird texts that come directly from a twisted mind. Hope to inspire some, and distract others. Shall I say enjoy? Have fun anyways, and stay just the way you are, cause everyone else is already taken ;)

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