Shades of Gray from Grayson Co, TX #906 – r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r

DSC_7040 copy

r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r

E. E. Cummings, 18941962

                                     r-p-o-p-h-e-s-s-a-g-r
                           who
  a)s w(e loo)k
  upnowgath
                       PPEGORHRASS
                                                       eringint(o-
  aThe):l
               eA
                    !p:
S                                                                        a
                                      (r
  rIvInG                              .gRrEaPsPhOs)
                                                                         to
  rea(be)rran(com)gi(e)ngly
  ,grasshopper;


Edward Estlin Cummings is known for his radical experimentation with form, punctuation, spelling, and syntax; he abandoned traditional techniques and structures to create a new, highly idiosyncratic means of poetic expression.

I just saw a pretty creature amongst the johnson grass. E.E.Cummings saw much more than me. Oh how we are never too old to learn.

monos en theos  †† jas L

Shades of Gray from Grayson Co, TX #801 – Don’t let it pass you by!

14-08-12ftstock_6396 copy

I was shooting at a sunset when I felt a small bump at my feet and here was this lovely creation scurrying about. He was a good sized “pede” about 5-6 inches long. And this dude was fast. No time to get the macro kit. It was take it or leave it. I grabbed 3 or for frames as he moved across an asphalt trail and disappeared into the West TX weeds.

Life sometimes come at a 1/5000 of a second and sometimes as in this case a 1/30 of a second. Don’t let it pass you by…†…monos en theos…jim

Shades of Gray from Grayson Co, TX #781 – SEEK & YOU SHALL FIND

14-07-24flymunson_4979 copy

I almost walked right by this little creature. It was doing it’s thing atop this small (1/4 inch) bloom and was almost invisible in the last of the days light.

Have no idea what it is, but it always reminds me to be mindful.

There is most often always something there, we just have to look!   monos en theos…†…jim

Shades of Gray from Grayson Co, TX #772 – THE CICADAS ARE COMING -THE CICADAS ARE COMING

14-07-10bug_4647

 

While not as pretty as a sunset, it’s still part of nature. You got to take both the beauty and the beast. My dog Grace alerting me to this one emerging from ground. Read on, John the baptist would have seen it as a snack to go with the honey.

Cicadas live underground as nymphs for most of their lives, at depths ranging from about 30 centimetres (0.98 ft) down to 2.5 metres (8.2 ft). The nymphs feed on xylem sap from roots and have strong front legs for digging.

In the final nymphal instar, they construct an exit tunnel to the surface and emerge. They then molt (shed their skins) on a nearby plant for the last time and emerge as adults. The exuvia, or abandoned exoskeleton, remains, still clinging to the bark of trees.

Cicadas (/sɪˈkɑːdə/ or /sɪˈkdə/), alternatively spelled as cicala or cicale, are insects in the order Hemiptera, suborder Auchenorrhyncha (which was formerly included in the now invalid suborder Homoptera). Cicadas are in the superfamily Cicadoidea. Their eyes are prominent, though not especially large, and set wide apart on the anterior lateral corners of the frons. The wings are well-developed, with conspicuous veins; in some species the wing membranes are wholly transparent, whereas in many others the proximal parts of the wings are clouded or opaque and some have no significantly clear areas on their wings at all. About 2,500 species of cicada have been described, and many remain to be described. Cicadas live in temperate-to-tropical climates where they are among the most-widely recognized of all insects, mainly due to their large size and unique sound. Cicadas are often colloquially called locusts, although they are unrelated to true locusts, which are various species of swarming grasshopper. Cicadas are related to leafhoppers and spittlebugs.

Many people around the world regularly eat cicadas.  They are known to have been eaten in Ancient Greece as well as China, Malaysia, Burma, Latin America, and the Congo.]Female cicadas are prized for being meatier. Shells of cicadas are employed in the traditional medicines of China.

For those of us who suffer from tinnitus, the sound will seem normal (1click for sound)…†… monos en theos……jim

IMAGES OF SMALL THINGS FROM THE BIGGEST COUNTY IN TEXAS #624 -WALKING STICK

13-11-04-walkstick_2969 copy 13-11-04-walkstick_2961 copy

Yes, these are in color, just not much there. Grey bug on gray screen Got to grab whatever bugs are still around. We have had our first freeze and winter in near. These are harmless creatures and evidently the male has no hormone issues.

Stick insects, like praying mantises, show rocking behavior in which the insect makes rhythmic, repetitive, side-to-side movements. The common interpretation of this behavior’s function is it enhances crypsis by mimicking vegetation moving in the wind. However, these movements may be most important in allowing the insects to discriminate objects from the background by relative motion. Rocking movements by these generally sedentary insects may replace flying or running as a source of relative motion to help them discern objects in the foreground.

Mating behavior in Phasmatodea is impressive because of the extraordinarily long duration of pairings. A record among insects, the stick insect Necroscia sparaxes, found in India, is sometimes coupled for 79 days at a time. It is not uncommon for this species to assume the mating posture for days or weeks on end, and among some species (Diapheromera veliei Walsh and D. Covilleae), pairing has been observed to last three to 136 hours in captivity.Explanations for this behavior range from males guarding their mates against reproductive competitors to the view that the pairings are a defensive alliance.

enjoy a bug today ††† en theos †††jimwork

Untitled-1

john10:10

IMAGES OF SMALL THINGS FROM THE BIGGEST COUNTY IN TEXAS #600 – … somedays you’re the bug!

13-10-18IND CORN_0993 copy

Well it’s a strange old game you learn it slow
One step forward and it’s back you go
You’re standing on the throttle
You’re standing on the brake
In the groove ’til you make a mistake

Sometimes you’re the windshield
Sometimes you’re the bug
Sometimes it all comes together baby
Sometimes you’re just a fool in love
Sometimes you’re the Louisville Slugger
Sometimes you’re the ball
Sometimes it all comes together
Sometimes you’re gonna lose it all

You gotta know happy – you gotta know glad
Because you’re gonna know lonely
And you’re gonna know sad
When you’re rippin’ and you’re ridin’
And you’re coming on strong
You start slippin’ and slidin’
And it all goes wrong because

Sometimes you’re the windshield
Sometimes you’re the bug
Sometimes it all comes together baby
Sometimes you’re just a fool in love
Sometimes you’re the Louisville Slugger
Sometimes you’re the ball
Sometimes it all comes together
Sometimes you’re gonna lose it all

One day you got the glory and then you got none
One day you’re a diamond and then you’re a stone
Everything can change in the blink of an eye
So let the good times roll before we say goodbye because

Sometimes you’re the windshield
Sometimes you’re the bug
Sometimes it all comes together baby
Sometimes you’re just a fool in love
Sometimes you’re the Louisville Slugger
Sometimes you’re the ball
Sometimes it all comes together
Sometimes you’re gonna lose it all

Sometimes you’re the windshield
Sometimes you’re the bug
Sometimes it all comes together baby
Sometimes you’re just a fool in love

Sometimes you’re the windshield
Sometimes you’re the bug
Sometimes it all comes together baby
Sometimes you’re just a fool in love         @Mark Knopfler

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_rbjg2k6cI

which will it be today ††† en theos ††† jimwork

Untitled-1

jonh10:10

Photos on the journey #491 – It is a small world!

DSC_5776A

I just got a new Nikon PK-13 extension tube so I could get a bit closer to the small world. Of course, I would have one of the windiest days to try and explore this new world. I was almost getting seasick trying to follow this little bloom ( it is about the size of a dime) as it swayed it the breeze. Then, like magic, the wind paused, the tiniest speck of a red fly landed while I was in focus from about 3 inches away. The small world is an amazing journey.

Peaceout ††† en theos ††† jlawrence