IMAGES OF SMALL THINGS FROM THE BIGGEST COUNTY IN TEXAS #677 – & The frost is on the punkin errrr cacti!

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When the frost is on the punkin’ cacti, okay, I didn’t have any punkins, fodder or kyouck to work with.

When the Frost is on the Punkin

BY JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY

When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock,
And you hear the kyouck and gobble of the struttin’ turkey-cock,
And the clackin’ of the guineys, and the cluckin’ of the hens,
And the rooster’s hallylooyer as he tiptoes on the fence;
O, it’s then’s the times a feller is a-feelin’ at his best,
With the risin’ sun to greet him from a night of peaceful rest,
As he leaves the house, bareheaded, and goes out to feed the stock,
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock….

Go with what comes along † en theos ††jim

IMAGES OF SMALL – THINGS FROM THE BIGGEST COUNTY IN TEXAS #656 – Cholla at dusk with moon on the rise

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Cholla are native to northern Mexico and the Southwestern United States.

Cholla are known for their barbed spines that tenaciously attach to skin, fur, and clothing.

Stands of cholla are called ‘chollas gardens’ or ‘cholla forests’. Individuals within these colonies often exhibit the same DNA as they were formerly tubercles of an original plant.

Don’t confuse Cholla with Chola….but either one will stick ya! ††† en theos ††† jim

IMAGES OF SMALL THINGS FROM THE BIGGEST COUNTY IN TEXAS #566 – thorns in & from the heart.

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Life is thickly sown with thorns, and I know no other remedy than to pass quickly through them. The longer we dwell on our misfortunes, the greater is their power to harm us.  – Voltaire

Sometimes it a thorn that sticks in our heart and other times it is a thorn from our heart that does the most damage.

 “Work diligently the soil while you may. Break up your fallow with the plough. Cast away the stones from your field, and dig out the thorns. Be unwilling to have a ‘hard heart’…St. Augustine

Receive thorns with forgiveness, and try to not allow them to grow from your heart. ††† en theos ††† jimwork

 

Photos on the journey #497 – Prickly Pear-The beauty side that sticks with you not in you.

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Opuntia, also known as nopales or paddle cactus (see below), is a genus in the cactus family, Cactaceae.

Currently, only prickly pears are included in this genus of about 200 species distributed throughout most of the Americas. Chollas are now separated into the genus Cylindropuntia, which some still consider a subgenus of OpuntiaAustrocylindropuntiaCorynopuntia and Micropuntia are also often included in the present genus, but like Cylindropuntia they seem rather well distinct. Brasiliopuntia andMiqueliopuntia are closer relatives of Opuntia.

The most commonly culinary species is the Indian Fig Opuntia (O. ficusindica). Most culinary uses of the term “prickly pear” refer to this species. Prickly pears are also known as “tuna”, “nopal” or nopales, from the Nahuatl word nōpalli for the pads, or nostle, from the Nahuatl word nōchtli for the fruit; or paddle cactus.

The genus is named for the Ancient Greek city of Opus where, according to Theophrastus, an edible plant grew which could be propagated by rooting its leaves.

Enjoy the beauty and avoid the thorns today, it might just stick to ya! ††† en theos ††† jlawrence

Photos on the journey #481-Horse Crippler, Devil’s Head, Candy Cactus, Devil’s Pincushion, Manacaballo, Monco Caballo, Viznaga

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A cactus of many names, most of them negative sounding. But it produces a fruit that is attractive to deer, rabbits, and other small rodents. My dogs always go a little crazy trying to follow all the scent trails that lead from these lovely low-lying beauties.

The horse crippler cactus is broader than it is long. Normally it is 1–2 inches above the ground and up to 12 inches across. It is difficult to see, and many horses have been crippled from stepping on it. It usually has only 1 stem, occasionally 2 or 3. If injured at the tip, it may produce a cluster of small heads on top of the old one. The surface of the plant is dark green. It has about 14 spines at each areole, with a central spine that is longer and stronger than the others, 2– 3 inches long and straight to slightly-curved downward. The inverted bell-shaped flowers are 1– 2 3/4 inches across and about as tall. The outer petals are salmon-red, the inner ones salmon-pink with streaks of red. The edge of the petals has a feathery appearance. Anthers are pinkish to red, and the pistil is yellow to pink. The flower is somewhat fragrant.

Watch where you step! Peace@U ††† en theos ††† jlawrence

Photos on the journey #389

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We spent the last six days camping in our trailer at Seminole State Park, TX.

We had cloudy, cold, windy and rainy days, but all in all it was a great trip. We grabbed a little sunshine and managed to hike a total of 20 miles over 3 of the days that we were given.

Live is about taking what you get, not always about what you want…….en theos……….j lawrence