Shades of Gray from Grayson Co, TX #861 – Making a wish!

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Has anyone ever asked you to blow on a dandelion and make a wish? If you live in an area where dandelions grow, the chances are you have made a wish on them at some point, but did you ever wonder where that tradition originated and what the meaning behind it was?

Although the exact origin of the dandelion mythology isn’t known, we do know that these myths go back centuries and can be traced to the ancient Celts and the French. In fact, the name “dandelion” is an interpretation of the original French word for the flower dent de lion meaning “lion’s tooth”. For ages people have made wishes on dandelion seeds in the hopes of them coming true. Much of this may be attributed to the medicinal properties of dandelions. Before modern medicine, dandelions were used to treat infections, liver disease, cancer, and was used as a diuretic. Because the dandelion seemed like such a magical herb, folklore began to develop around the bright flower developing into the dandelions myths of today.

Wishes

Dandelions bloom a bright yellow/orange color but change into gray/white seeds when they are ready to disperse. The gray/white seeds are what you blow on to make a wish. You are supposed to think really hard on your wish and then blow off all of the white seeds, sending your wish flying into the air in a beautiful display. If there are no seeds left on your stem then your wish will come true.

Luck

It is widely believed that if a bride used dandelions in her bridal bouquet then her marriage will have good luck. Or if you dream about dandelions that your will be blessed with good luck.

Growth

Children often make a game out of trying to find the tallest dandelion in the field because traditional mythology holds that the length of the dandelion a child picked was equal to the number of inches they would grow in the next year.

Romance

Many people believe that if you blow every seed of the dandelion off while thinking of a loved one it means that they love you back. Another legend is that if you pick one seed off the bloom and concentrate every ounce of love you feel for someone and them blow it in the direction of where you loved one is, they will feel your love. Conversely, if you then blow on the bloom and there is at least one remaining seed on it, it means your loved one is thinking of you too.

Dandelions are cheerful, bright, and magical flowers, but most people look at them and see nothing but weeds. Next time you look at a dandelion and see nothing but a weed, think about how magical they can be. And if you don’t believe in magic, then think about all the medicinal properties of dandelions, many of which, are still used today. And, if you still look at them as weeds, pick one up, blow, and make a wish that your yard will be free of weeds!

Shades of Gray from Grayson Co, TX #846…Dandelion Facts

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Here are some interesting facts about the dandelion flower:

  • The dandelion is the only flower that represents the 3 celestial bodies of the sun, moon and stars. The yellow flower resembles the sun, the puff ball resembles the moon and the dispersing seeds resemble the stars.
  • The dandelion flower opens to greet the morning and closes in the evening to go to sleep.
  • Every part of the dandelion is useful: root, leaves, flower. It can be used for food, medicine and dye for coloring.
  • Up until the 1800s people would pull grass out of their lawns to make room for dandelions and other useful “weeds” like chickweed, malva, and chamomile.
  • The average American recognizes thousands of logos for commercial products, yet recognizes fewer than five plants that grow in his/her area. Dandelions are most likely one of those familiar plants.
  • The name dandelion is taken from the French word “dent de lion” meaning lion’s tooth, referring to the coarsely-toothed leaves.
  • Dandelions have one of the longest flowering seasons of any plant.
  • Seeds are often carried as many as 5 miles from their origin!
  • A not so fun fact: Every year Americans spend millions on lawn pesticides to have uniform lawns of non-native grasses, and we use 30% of the country’s water supply to keep them green.

 

 

Heck, and just thought they were fun for children of all ages to blow the seeds into the wind! I always thought the seeds to be more like parachutes than stars…..monos en theos…†…jim

IMAGES OF SMALL THINGS FROM THE BIGGEST COUNTY IN TEXAS #634 – THE LOWLY DANDELION

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This stellar dandelion flower was made in New Mexico last summer. It was being warmed by the waning minutes of the golden hour. Additional warm tones came from a small gold reflector used for fill. The specular highlights were provided by a small creek reflecting gold in the background

Here are some interesting facts about the dandelion flower:

    • The dandelion is the only flower that represents the 3 celestial bodies of the sun, moon and stars. The yellow flower resembles the sun, the puff ball resembles the moon and the dispersing seeds resemble the stars.
    • The dandelion flower opens to greet the morning and closes in the evening to go to sleep.
    • Every part of the dandelion is useful: root, leaves, flower. It can be used for food, medicine and dye for coloring.
    • Up until the 1800s people would pull grass out of their lawns to make room for dandelions and other useful “weeds” like chickweed, malva, and chamomile.
    • The average American recognizes thousands of logos for commercial products, yet recognizes fewer than five plants that grow in his/her area. Dandelions are most likely one of those familiar plants.
    • The name dandelion is taken from the French word “dent de lion” meaning lion’s tooth, referring to the coarsely-toothed leaves.
    • Dandelions have one of the longest flowering seasons of any plant.
    • Seeds are often carried as many as 5 miles from their origin!
  • A not so fun fact: Every year Americans spend millions on lawn pesticides to have uniform lawns of non-native grasses, and we use 30% of the country’s water supply to keep them green.

Find some warmth in your day. Visit the golden hour. Blessings ††† en theos †††jim