IMAGES OF SMALL THINGS FROM THE BIGGEST COUNTY IN TEXAS #588 – Ah Texas, it just makes you look at things a little different.

rattesnake

We were talking with our waitress at lunch in Alpine Tx yesterday. She is a long time friend and proudly showed off photos of her young son and his recent rattlesnake kill. You just got to love living here.

Now I am not an extreme gun rights advocate, I just simply believe it is our right to have firearms and to use them when necessary. I am not sorry that this just seems right and natural.

Yes, to rest freely in west Texas. For the last few nights, I have watched the same disturbing video of the bikers v the SUV:  http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/03/us/bikers-attack-video/

Every time I watch it, I keep asking myself, why doesn’t the driver of the SUV exercise his second amendment rights?

Is it just me, but would this happen in west Texas? I just don’t think so. Let the talking heads debate what the driver could or should of done. For me, if I can’t have high capacity magazines, I am adding a couple more clips to the console of the truck.

Live free! ††† en theos ††† jimwork

Images of small things from the biggest county in Texas #538 – albeit misplaced – A pretty northern red bellied snake

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We had a healthy amount of rain yesterday and I was excited to see what new growth we would find on our evening walk. My dogs passed right over this beautiful creature that was basking in the waning warmth of the asphalt. Having never seen this species, I gathered him up and brought him home for a proper portrait.

He was a small fellow about 12-14 inches long. Extremely docile little guy who curled comfortably amongst my fingers. His underbelly ran from orange under the head to red at the tail. He posed very nicely and then I released him amongst the four o’clocks.

The small, secretive red-bellied snake (Storeria occipitomaculata) is a distinctive reptile which gains its common name from the crimson-red underside which occurs in most individuals. However, the underparts of this species are known to vary between bright red and yellow .

The upper-parts of the red-bellied snake are also variable and can be grey, brown, red-brown or black with a light, wide stripe which extends along the length of the back . Four narrower stripes may occasionally be present on the backs of some individuals.

The range of the red-bellied snake extends across eastern North America, from southern Canada in the north to Florida and Texas in the south, including Oklahoma, Kansas and North and South Dakota. The red-bellied snake inhabits areas of deciduous or mixed woodland, as well as meadows, marshes, pastures, swamp edges and prairies , where it shelters under rocks, logs or leaf litter on the ground. Within these habitats this species is generally found in moist areas although it also inhabits dry areas such as rocky hills.

May you find something new as you travel an old route. ††† en theos ††† jim work

Photo of Da day @ Da Pine #241

As I have mentioned, we got to see a large variety of creatures in Big Bend our last trip. Yesterday I posted baby Javelina and today you get a snake in the water, which is better than two in the grass. I believe this is a Western coach-whip that was swimming across the beaver pond near Rio Grande campground. He might have just been cooling off, it was over 90 degrees.

I was focused on watching a bird when I noticed the bird was eying  something in the water near me. I am not at all real fond of snakes, but felt pretty safe with me on dry land and him in the water.  I know it could have been better to have a good macho snake like a Rattlesnake, but I am more a tamer variety now and so should be my subjects.

Grow happy with who you really are on your journey††nada te turbe††jim